Butyr-Fentanyl


butyr-fentanyl


Chemical Data :

IUPAC: N-(1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl)-N-phenylbutyramide

CAS: 1169-70-6

ChemSpider: 539764

Molecular Weight: 350.5 g/mol

Molecular Formula: C23H30N2O


Butyrfentanyl is a highly potent and short acting opioid analgesic drug and analogue of fentanyl. It is known to be an agonist at μ-opioid receptors.

It goes by the formal and systematic IUPAC name N-(1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl)-N-phenylbutyramide. Butyrfentanyl has a relative molar mass of 350.5 grams and empirical formula C23H30N2O.

A study in to the strength of binding of fentanyl and its analogues has produced the following ranking from the strongest and most potent to the least potent. (±)-cis-3-methylfentanyl > fentanyl = alpha-methylfentanyl > butyrylfentanyl > benzylfentanyl. It is worth noting however, that all fentanyl analogues are many times more potent than morphine. Overall this means that butyrfentanyl is a less potent μ-opioid agonist than fentanyl.

The Ki value for fentanyl is 1.06 ± 0.15 nM, compared to the weaker binding of Butyrfentanyl which has a Ki of 32 ± 4.1 nM. Butyrfentanyl was found to have a low ability to displace fentanyl from the opioid receptor, with a very high relative concentration of butyrfentanyl required in order to achieve this.

Studies on the metabolism and excretion of butyrfentanyl have found it is eliminated almost entirely within 3 hours of injection.

Fentanyl and its analogues are linked to a large number of deaths of opioid users around the world.

Butyrfentanyl is likely to be extremely potent and active in the ug range. A lethal dose would therefore consist of a barely visible amount of drug crystal. A solution of butyrfentanyl is so potent that it can kill simply through spilling on the skin. It is also potentially deadly when combined with other depressive drugs notably other opiates, benzodiazepines, GBH/GBL, ketamine, PCP, thienodiazepines and alcohol.

If this compound is found in a pure form it is highly recommended that one use gloves when handling it.  Additionally one ought to use volumetric dosing combined with a milligram scale in order to produce solutions of appropriate concentration. Failure to treat this compound with respect can easily lead to a fatality.

Butyrfentanyl is not for human or animal consumption.

Unverifiable online reports give us some indication of the effects of Butyrfentanyl. It is said to produce effects similar to fentanyl which include strong levels of pain relief, physical euphoria that is lower than morphine and heroin, overwhelming sedation, deep respiratory depression, cough suppression, constipation, sweating, nausea and vomiting, loss of apetite, difficulty urinating and reduced sex drive.

Fentanyl and its analogues are considered significantly more sedating than heroin and oxycodone. They produce a heavy “nod” and are likely to send the user to sleep.

The most dangerous aspect of these compounds is their heavy and overwhelming respiratory depression relative to the euphoria produced. Even at low doses fentanyl and its analogues like butyrfentanyl are said to produce a feeling that the breath is being slowed. At higher doses and indeed in overdose butyrfentanyl will induce extreme shortness of breath, abnormal breathing patterns, semi-consciousness and total loss of consciousness. Users are at extreme risk of developing brain damage due to low oxygen levels. Additionally many users die from aspirating their own vomit or saliva during an overdose.

Other names and synonyms:

Butanamide, N-phenyl-N-[1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl]- [ACD/Index Name]
N-Phenyl-N-[1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl]butanamid [German] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
N-Phenyl-N-[1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl]butanamide [ACD/IUPAC Name]
N-Phényl-N-[1-(2-phényléthyl)-4-pipéridinyl]butanamide [French] [ACD/IUPAC Name]
Methyl-3-fentanyl
N-Phenyl-N-(1-phenethyl-4-piperidinyl)butanamide